Oystering With Norm Bloom and Son

Workers on the Little Growler move oysters over to a smaller boat, to be taken ashore and kept fresh. Photo Credit: Nancy Guenther Chapman
The Ringgold Brothers on Aug. 9, 2012. It was built in 1907. Photo Credit: Nancy Guenther Chapman
Mario Romano of Norwalk helps Sal Rodriguez secure his boat to the side of the Ringgold Brothers. Photo Credit: Nancy Guenther Chapman
Workers sort out the marketable oysters from those that need to grow more and from shells. Photo Credit: Nancy Guenther Chapman
Oyster boats in Long Island Sound on Aug. 9. Photo Credit: Nancy Guenther Chapman
Oysters being taken ashore. Photo Credit: Nancy Guenther Chapman
A Norm Bloom and Sons worker. Two of the immigrants have become American citizens, John Rauscher said. Photo Credit: Nancy Guenther Chapman
Sal Rodriguez catches oysters tossed from the deck of the Little Growler. Photo Credit: Nancy Guenther Chapman
Oysters are transferred off the deck of the Ringgold Brothers. Photo Credit: Nancy Guenther Chapman
Workers sort out the marketable oysters from those that need to grow more and from shells. Photo Credit: Nancy Guenther Chapman
A full-time welder builds new dredging cages for Norm Bloom and Son, John Rauscher said. They last one to two years. Photo Credit: Nancy Guenther Chapman
Oysters being taken ashore. Photo Credit: Nancy Guenther Chapman
The dredging cage comes up with more oysters. Photo Credit: Nancy Guenther Chapman
Photo Credit: Nancy Guenther Chapman
Photo Credit: Nancy Guenther Chapman
Photo Credit: Nancy Guenther Chapman
Photo Credit: Nancy Guenther Chapman
Photo Credit: Nancy Guenther Chapman
Photo Credit: Nancy Guenther Chapman
Jimmy Bloom heads out to dump shells leftover from the sorting process in the chipping room. Photo Credit: Nancy Guenther Chapman
Photo Credit: Nancy Guenther Chapman
Photo Credit: Nancy Guenther Chapman
  • Comments (1)

NORWALK, Conn. – John Rauscher looked out the window at his co-workers, a steady chip-chip-chip sound in the salt air along with the music on the radio and the hum of the boat's engine. He was happy to have landed on his feet in a tough economy four years ago with a job in the waters off Norwalk and Westport.

"I wish I was here 10 years," said the Milford man, a former asbestos-removal supervisor who was piloting the Ringgold Brothers, a century-old Chesapeake Bay oyster boat belonging to Norm Bloom and Son.

Mario Romano, a lifelong Norwalker, and four men from Honduras ...
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Comments (1)

Norm Bloom and his sons provide an excellent product in their farmed oysters. I have met Norm on several occasions and he even invited me out on one of his oyster harvesting boats. Would have loved to had sone that but the circumstances at the time prevented this.

The oysters are as good as they can be. Clean, salty and plump. Recalling the hay days of the Chesapeake Bay oysters which due to a variety of political decisions is now almost nonexistent. But Norm's oysters are now far better. I usually purchase a 100 count box every time I travel in CT.

There is one problem with Norm's website. It states NO PHONE orders but also mentions that for those who want to pick up the oysters at the pier there might be a two hour wait as they pack the order. I might be better if pier pick up orders could be phoned in and paid with a credit card just to insure they would be picked up. It was difficult to get their phone number. Their website does not show a phone number.

Overall Norm has created a superior product in his farmed oysters. Do hope that they have recovered from the adverse effects of hurricane Sandy. Will be stopping by this coming Tuesday 7Oct2014 for a 100 count box. Hope they will take me order over the phone for pickup in the early afternoon.